State of Being Verbs: To be Used or to be Avoided?

You might be asking yourself what “to be” verbs really are. There is a simple explanation. It is a group of verbs that are commonly used in all kinds of writing. You may have been using them without knowing it. You may be reading them right now as you are wondering why this paragraph seems so choppy.

We’re talking state of being (is, am, are, was, were, be, being, been). That’s what we call those “to be” verbs.

Overusing state of being verbs can give your writing some stubborn setbacks, like false impressions, vague generalizations, and confusing subjects. Here’s how to spot them, find the right substitution, and write with more illustration.

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Transitional Phrases: Helping Your Reader “Get There”

Readers are creatures of habit. As an author, you’ll form your own voice and technique—your habits—and your reader will learn to pick up on these. But, if you get into the practice of choppy writing, your audience will also notice that pattern and may lose interest before you can communicate anything important. That’s why it’s important to have a few tools in your back pocket, like transitional phrases. These phrases can help you move smoothly from one topic to another and keep an unfocused reader interested and engaged.

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Sensory Details: Letting the Reader Experience Your World

Have you ever been listening to the radio when a song came on that pulled you back to a particular moment of your life? Suddenly, you remember every detail of that time, memories flooding back, simply because you heard something you experienced during an important event. Listening to the radio, your brain made connections to a memory without conscious effort on your part.

You felt, simply from hearing.

You can do the same thing in your writing.  You can make someone feel simply from the details that you choose.  In fact, this is of the utmost importance, particularly in narrative writing. Leaving out sensory details can be like watching a movie and suddenly becoming very aware that there is no background noise in a scene—but there should be! We are a sensory species and crave that connection in all of our experiences; reading is no exception.

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